Thursday, July 1, 2010

From the Clamor of Traffic





Happy is the man who drinks
his final egg cream
before leaving the smog
and the heat of the city.

From the closed, shadowed streets
to the wide, open skies.
From the clamor of traffic
to the song of the wind.
Under a tree in the country
all the things in the world
are fulfilled.


--written by Hedgehog, June 2010

30 comments:

xl said...

Lovely photo and poem!

savannah said...

nicely done, sugar! xoxo

Leah said...

Thanks on behalf of Hedgie, guys. I discovered a whole cache of poetry when she brought her folders home from school at the end of the year.

Tracey said...

Well done Hedgehog!

I am fascinated by this school. I am not sure it would suit my children, as their father is the Alex P. Keaton type whom it was my ambition to marry. But I am fascinated none-the-less. I like the free-range, yet academically rigorous, feel I get from your stories. Much how I would want home schooling to go if I attempted it.

I can't wait to read Hedgie's blog when she is all grown up and has followed her ambitions.

Brian Miller said...

woohoo. nice imagery hedgehog! keep it coming! and a wonderful pic as well. smiles.

Betsy said...

The girl has talent...and beauty! :)

Mrsupole said...

Oh my, the seed does not fall far from the tree.

Hedgie is growing up and growing up beautifully. She is a fantastic poem writer and takes after you totally. All I can say to her is, "You go girl! You rock!" Keep up the good work and someday you will have a fantastic book of poems.

And the beauty to go with the brains, now that is something.

She is a rare gem indeed.

God bless.

Baino said...

She has the family writing gene I think. Perhaps that's what I should do this weekend, leave the smog and the chill of the city and just contemplate my navel whilst sitting under a tree!

Mike129 said...

Excellent!

Beautiful photos and beautiful works.

I like.

The Unbearable Banishment said...

I hope you don't mind my saying, but she has a most inappropriate nickname. Can you change is to something more appropriate for the beautiful girl in the photo?

Princess said...

Dear Hedgehog,
You have inherited your mothers gift for combining the visual with the writen and spoken form.
Congratulations... it is a lovely poem thank you... Are they cherry blossoms? They are a beautiful colour.
And congratulations to both Leah and Sarge for raising such a tallented tresure...

Suzanne said...

Heggie, that's so beautiful. I though it was Mom. I was so impressed I called Rob in to read it. Loves it too. He loves words. And really smart kids!!! And Leah...that's a gorgeous photo. And Leah, why does Heggie just keep getting more and more stunning? And keeps growing up? Why are the years just flying by? I love you all. Have a beautiful time in the mountains. I'll think of you there. Oh, and Leah, don't forget to stop by "Confessions" before you leave!!! XOXOXOXO

Pearl said...

That was just plain cooling on the skin...

Thanks!

Pearl

Megan said...

Dang.

nick said...

That's a wonderful poem. I so agree with the sentiment in the last three lines.

Alan Burnett said...

Lovely poem. That is one talented hedgehog you have there.

Hunter said...

Well done! Hedgie is an exceptionally talented young lady.

Leah said...

Tracey: it's a very interesting comment you made, and I think you have it pegged perfectly: free-range but rigorous. It is definitely not a school for everyone, and in fact many children wouldn't feel comfortable with the intellectual freedom (which can be overwhelming). I knew a lot of kids, when I went there, who left precipitously because the intensity and self-direction was way too much for them. Which is no judgment on them--the school works for some, but not for others.

One of the most unusual things about it is the lack of a grading system (not sure if I mentioned this before). All the way through twelfth grade, the kids get anecdotal reports instead of letter or number grades. Much more work for the teachers, and it makes for an interesting transition to college. Funnily enough, the college admissions record is stellar despite that fact--I think colleges know all about the school and the fact that it doesn't give grades, and the admissions departments work with that.

Ella's third grade experience there was incredible--she lucked into two of the best teachers, with an amazing curriculum. All year she was coming home excited about school, telling us all about it, just totally engaged.

But yes, it's a hard sell to some folk. Even my husband had to be convinced, but he seems delighted now about certain aspects--especially how thrilled the kids are with the whole learning experience, how much they want to go to school.

Anyway, I'm a big believer in this kind of schooling--what would you even call it? I don't know. Experimental? Progressive? It worked very well for me, and seems to be working well for Hedgehog. Although, to be honest, she would probably have enjoyed a "regular" school, just because she likes learning...

Oh well, I could go on and on...

Leah said...

Dang that was a loooong comment...

UB: Hedgehog doesn't like that nickname either. It seemed to fit her when she was younger, but now she wants me to call her "Beebee" on the blog, as that's a shortening of Beatrice, her middle name. I wonder if I could make the transition?

63mago said...

Is egg-cream a reference to Baileys?

63mago said...

I forgot, what you say about the school reminds me a bit of "Waldorf", Reformpädagogik, Steiner.

Pat said...

I have great hopes for Hedgehog and I agree with UB about her nickname.

Old Knudsen said...

It doesn't rhyme but its pretty good anyway. I wouldn't let ma kids read it of course.

just bob said...

writing apparently runs in the family

Ponita in Real Life said...

Perfect... both the picture and the poem! That girl's got talent and beauty. xoxo

Leah said...

Thank you to all who commented! Hedgie (although we're working on another name for her) really enjoyed reading them.

xoxo

Leah said...

mago, in fact we had considered a Waldorf school for her. I really like the whole Waldorf philosophy, which is in fact a bit different from the philosophy of her school, but is progressive and was at its inception quite experimental!

e said...

A stunning girl and her stunning words...the apple doesn't fall far from the tree...Beautiful!

Karen ^..^ said...

This amazing and introspective daughter of yours has some very deep talent, my friend. She is most definitely her mother's daughter.

muralimanohar said...

Gorgeous girl and awesome poem. Reminds me that I was right not to ever pursue poetry. I would make a right mull of it, and be hugely outshown by the aforementioned 9yo gorgeous girl.